Calico discount Joe: outlet sale A Novel outlet sale

Calico discount Joe: outlet sale A Novel outlet sale

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Description

Product Description

“Grisham knocks it out of the park.”—The Washington Post
 
It’s the summer of 1973, and Joe Castle is the boy wonder of baseball, the greatest rookie anyone has ever seen. The kid from Calico Rock, Arkansas, dazzles Chicago Cubs fans as he hits home run after home run, politely tipping his hat to the crowd as he shatters all rookie records. Calico Joe quickly becomes the idol of every baseball fan in America, including Paul Tracey, the young son of a hard-partying and hard-throwing New York Mets pitcher. On the day that Warren Tracey finally faces Calico Joe, Paul is in the stands, rooting for his idol but also for his dad. Then Warren throws a fastball that will change their lives forever.
 
#1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER
 
“An enjoyable, heartwarming read that’s not just for baseball fans.”— USA Today
 
“Grisham has hit a home run. . . . Calico Joe is a great read, a lyrical ode to baseball, small-town America, youthful innocence and a young boy’s search for heroes.” —The Buffalo News
 
“[A] pleasure . . . Suffice to say [Grisham] knows his way around the ballpark as well as he does a courtroom.” —The Washington Times

Includes an excerpt of John Grisham’s The Racketeer

Review

Praise for Calico Joe
 
“Grisham knocks it out of the park.”— The Washington Post
 
“An enjoyable, heartwarming read that’s not just for baseball fans.”— USA Today
 
Praise for John Grisham
 
“Never let it be said this man doesn’t know how to spin a good yarn.” —Entertainment Weekly
 
“Grisham may well be the best American storyteller writing today.” —The Philadelphia Inquirer

About the Author

John Grisham is the author of twenty-five novels, including, most recently, The Racketeer; one work of nonfiction; a collection of stories; and a series for young readers. The recipient of the Harper Lee Prize for Legal Fiction, he is also the chairman of the board of directors of the Mississippi Innocence Project at the University of Mississippi School of Law. He lives in Virginia and Mississippi.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

1

The tumor in my father''s pancreas was removed last week in an operation that lasted five hours and was more difficult than his surgeons had expected. Afterward, they delivered the grim news that most people in his condition could not expect to live for more than ninety days. Since I knew nothing of the surgery, or the tumor, I was not there when he was given his death sentence. Communication is not a priority with my father. Ten years ago he divorced one wife and had found another before word filtered down to me.

His current wife--she''s either number five or number six--eventually called and, after reintroducing herself, passed along the barest of details about the tumor and its related issues. Agnes explained that my father was not feeling well and didn''t want to talk. I replied that he had never wanted to talk, regardless of how he felt. She asked me to spread the news to the rest of the family. I almost asked "Why?" but didn''t want to bicker with this poor woman.

The rest of the family consists of my younger sister, Jill, and my mother. Jill lives in Seattle and, as far as I know, has not spoken to our father in at least ten years. She has two small children who have never met him, and never will. My mother, after surviving twelve years of marriage, got lucky and got out, taking Jill and me with her, and I have a hunch that the news of his impending death will have zero impact on her.

Needless to say, we do not get together at Christmas and exchange gifts by the fire.

After the phone call from Agnes, I sit at my desk and ponder life without Warren, my father. I started calling him Warren when I was in college because he was more of a person, a stranger, than a father. He did not object. He has never cared what I call him, and I have always assumed he prefers that I don''t call him at all. At least I make the occasional effort; he never has.

After a few minutes, I admit the truth--life without Warren will be the same as life with him.

I call Jill and break the news. Her first question is whether I plan to attend the funeral, which is somewhat premature. She wants to know if she should try to visit him, to say hello and good-bye and go through the phony motions of acting as though she cares, when in fact she does not. Nor do I, and we both admit this. We have no love for Warren because he never cared for us. He abandoned the family when we were kids and has spent the past thirty years acting as though we do not exist. Jill and I are both parents now, and we find it inconceivable that a father can have no use for his own children.

"I''m not going," she finally declares. "Now, or later. How about you?"

"I don''t know," I reply. "I''ll have to think about it."

The truth is that I know I will go see him. He has burned most of the bridges in his life, but there is one rather substantial piece of unfinished business that he has to deal with before he dies.

My mother lives in Tulsa with her second husband. In high school, Warren was the superjock, and she was the homecoming queen, the most popular girl. Their wedding thrilled their small town, but after a couple of years with Warren all thrills were gone. I know they have not spoken to each other in decades, and why should they?

"Mom, I have some bad news," I say into the phone, trying to seem sufficiently somber.

"What is it?" she asks quickly, probably afraid it is one of her grandchildren.

"Warren''s sick. Pancreatic cancer, he has less than three months to live."

A pause, relief, then, "I was assuming he was already dead."

And there you have it. His memorial service will not be packed with grieving family members.

"I''m sorry," she says, but she is not. "I guess you''ll have to deal with it."

"I suppose."

"I don''t want to be bothered with it, Paul, just call me when it''s over. Or don''t. I don''t care what happens to Warren."

"I understand, Mom."

I know he hit her a few times, probably a lot more than I realized. And he drank and chased women and lived the hard life of a professional baseball player. He was arrogant and cocky, and from the age of fifteen he was accustomed to getting whatever he wanted because he, Warren Tracey, could throw a baseball through a brick wall.

We manage to move the conversation to the kids and when she might see them again. Because of her beauty and brains, she landed on her feet after Warren. She married a slightly older man, an executive for a drilling company, and he provided a fine home for Jill and me. He loves my mom, and that''s all that matters.

I doubt if Warren ever did.

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Customer reviews

4.4 out of 54.4 out of 5
5,074 global ratings

Top reviews from the United States

Dr. David P. Craig
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Heart Warming Story of Forgiveness and Redemption
Reviewed in the United States on February 8, 2020
Two of my favorite subjects are addressed in this book: Baseball and Redemption. Two definitions for redemption are as follows: (1) the action of being saved from sin, error, or evil; and (2) the action of regaining possession of something in exchange for a payment, or... See more
Two of my favorite subjects are addressed in this book: Baseball and Redemption. Two definitions for redemption are as follows: (1) the action of being saved from sin, error, or evil; and (2) the action of regaining possession of something in exchange for a payment, or clearing a debt.

In this well-written short story by Grisham (I read it from cover to cover in one sitting), tells a gut wrenching story of an abusive alcoholic father (who happens to be a professional pitcher for the New York Mets); the story of his eleven year old son; and a rookie phenom nicknamed Calico Joe who is setting records left and right coming up to the majors with the Chicago Cubs.

From the three perspectives: alcoholic abusive father; young impressionable son; and talented young phenom Graham develops the story over what happens to each of these key "players" over the next thirty years. Without giving away the plot - the story keeps you gripped as you hope for a great ending. Grisham delivers (as usual) on developing a great plot that does not disappoint. 

The reader is drawn in to the story from the get go, and Grisham continues to draw the reader into the story. It''s as if you are involved emotionally, spiritually, and at times, even physically with the characters of the story. The story is one of great lessons: the wasted or  unexamined life isn''t worth living; death is approaching fast - so make your life and relationships count; second chances are available; redemption and forgiveness are possible for everyone. I highly recommend this book as a terrific read that with an ending that is insightful, wise, and full of hope.
10 people found this helpful
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SteVen H.
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
...wonderful fictional sports story by a great storyteller.
Reviewed in the United States on April 16, 2021
Book Review – Calico Joe – John Grisham In preparation for John Grisham’s first ever basketball story coming out in late April entitled “Sooley” - about an African born (Sudan) basketball player – I decided to re-read his first baseball novel, “Calico Joe.” Grisham''s... See more
Book Review – Calico Joe – John Grisham
In preparation for John Grisham’s first ever basketball story coming out in late April entitled “Sooley” - about an African born (Sudan) basketball player – I decided to re-read his first baseball novel, “Calico Joe.” Grisham''s story telling in this sports fiction novel is impeccable. Naturally he is good at crime and courtroom drama in his legal thrillers, but in this fictional sports story, he also ‘knocks it out of the park’! The character development is just where it needs to be, realistic and compelling. The story pacing is like a baseball game itself, no time clock forcing an end. Instead, the story of Calico Joe unfolds like life itself, full of cause and effect, decisions and consequences, uncertainties of outcomes. Grisham’s brilliance and versatility of using factual names and places in a fictional story are on display in this wonderful sports fiction written primarily for the nostalgic baseball fan. Although Calico Joe is a baseball story, it is mainly a ‘people’ story. It brings together very different individuals and tells a surprising and moving tale of fathers and sons, forgiveness and redemption, all set in the world of Major League Baseball. The baseball part of the story is thrilling, but it’s what happens off the field that makes Calico Joe a must read. I highly recommend it…
2 people found this helpful
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Donald HuntTop Contributor: Writing
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
The Unwritten Rule...
Reviewed in the United States on March 25, 2019
I write a lot of reviews and also write pulp fiction (mystery and horror). I read as much as possible and across many genres, sports is always near the top of my list. Calico Joe, hit (no pun intended) me for three reasons; I love baseball. I am a NY... See more
I write a lot of reviews and also write pulp fiction (mystery and horror).
I read as much as possible and across many genres, sports is always near
the top of my list.
Calico Joe, hit (no pun intended) me for three reasons; I love baseball. I am a
NY Mets fan. I lived through that 1973 season.
I devoured the story in a flash (I am also a speed reader) and enjoyed reliving
the summer/fall of 1973.
I don''t believe in giving away storylines, as that takes away the author''s thunder.
But, I will say; Calico Joe, is more than just a baseball tale.
Enjoy...
8 people found this helpful
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A.E. Pagano
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Another Grisham gem
Reviewed in the United States on June 17, 2021
Not a legal thriller but still a great story about a dysfunctional family, ego and the trappings of professional sports. Grisham mastery works in nearly every genre. Incorporating the storyline into the actual seasons of 2 well known sports teams adds to the enjoyment.
3 people found this helpful
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Author Don Massenzio
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A departure for John Grisham
Reviewed in the United States on February 10, 2015
Calico Joe is a bit of a departure for John Grisham. The deals with a man who is facing the death of his estranged father from a terminal disease. The uniqueness of this situation comes from the background of the father and the titular character, Calico Joe. The father was... See more
Calico Joe is a bit of a departure for John Grisham. The deals with a man who is facing the death of his estranged father from a terminal disease. The uniqueness of this situation comes from the background of the father and the titular character, Calico Joe. The father was a major league pitcher for the New York Mets. Calico Joe was a prodigious rookie having the season of a lifetime when his career is ended by the pitcher. As the man faces death, the protagonist tries to convince him to face what he did and apologize to the now disabled man.

The story is very touching and, amazingly, does not deal with the law or lawyers in any way. Grisham does a great job hopping back and forth between the present and the past where the protagonist relives the tumultuous childhood that he experienced with this abusive professional athlete.

Grisham weaves in real and fictional major league players and, by default, reveals his love for the American pastime. It was an enjoyable read.
19 people found this helpful
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Amazon Customer
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Play ball
Reviewed in the United States on May 5, 2021
Mr. Grisham’s prose took me back to my childhood. My newspaper articles cut from our local paper The Virginian Pilot and the Sunday New York Times my father bought every week after mass. Of course mine had to do with the 1961 home run contest between Roger Maris and... See more
Mr. Grisham’s prose took me back to my childhood. My newspaper articles cut from our local paper The Virginian Pilot and the Sunday New York Times my father bought every week after mass. Of course mine had to do with the 1961 home run contest between Roger Maris and Mickey Mantle being a lifelong Yankee fan.

I am recommending this book to my brother Joe who is a voracious reader and also a Yankee fan. Additionally Paul’s baseball career somewhat mirrors my mediocre experiences from age 9 through high school.

But one of the most enjoyable aspects of the book centers on the relationship of Paul, Jill, and their mom and the emotional support each offers as a buttress against abuse and distress.

Excellent work Mr. Grisham.
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Robin Landry
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
unforgettable
Reviewed in the United States on August 30, 2014
I loved this novel, just as I''ve loved all of John Grisham''s stories because his characters have such heart. I feel as though I know Paul Tracey now, I know what it''s like to love baseball and to want a parent to be your hero, and have your admiration always shut down. I... See more
I loved this novel, just as I''ve loved all of John Grisham''s stories because his characters have such heart. I feel as though I know Paul Tracey now, I know what it''s like to love baseball and to want a parent to be your hero, and have your admiration always shut down. I feel like I can watch baseball now and know enough to enjoy it because of Grisham''s story, and that is exactly why I read. To be immersed in another world to the point where I feel as if I''ve actually visited that world.

Calico Joe is a story about a young boy, Paul and his love for both this father, and for baseball. Unfortunately for Paul, his father, who''s a pitcher the New York Mets, is not worthy of his son''s admiration. A narcissist bordering on sociopath, Warren Tracey is the kind of guy who shifts his responsibilities onto everyone else so his ego can stay falsely inflated. The story takes us from 1973 to 2003 in flashbacks centering on a moment in baseball history that changed Paul''s life, his father''s, and a promising rookie named Joe Castle.

John Grisham entertains us with an important life lesson, wrapping it in his love for baseball that gives the story its extra-special dimension. The lesson is about how we have to claim responsibility for what we do in order to be a good person, and while forgiveness is possible, it can''t change the messes we make in our lives. Forgiving doesn''t mean forgetting, it means moving forward and getting on with life the best we can under new circumstances. Joe displays grace in the face of horrific circumstances that could have been avoided, while Warren shows how blaming others can leave a trail of regrets.

This is a story that will stick with me for a long time. Sure the good guys and the bad guys were very black and white, but that''s not to say that there aren''t people out there that display such a contrast of light and dark. Grisham is a writer at the top of his game, and always a pleasure to read. He''s one of my favorite writers of all time, and I hope he doesn''t stop writing in my lifetime.
8 people found this helpful
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Scott HedegardTop Contributor: Rock Music
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A moving and fond look at the world of pro baseball
Reviewed in the United States on September 2, 2013
John Grisham is best known for thrillers, legal usually, but has also authored many books outside that perimeter, including "A Painted House", and a very strong non-fiction book that examines the unfairness of the death penalty and the corrupting world around it called "An... See more
John Grisham is best known for thrillers, legal usually, but has also authored many books outside that perimeter, including "A Painted House", and a very strong non-fiction book that examines the unfairness of the death penalty and the corrupting world around it called "An Innocent Man".
He brings the old days of professional baseball to life with "Calico Joe", that is made more interesting as its time frame in 1973 coincides with my own boyhood interest in what was once a cool game before massive trades and the total disappearance of team loyalty ruined the game for me. "Calico Joe" is one Joe Castle, a young ball player out of the small Arkansas village Calico Rock who, for a brief time with the Chicago Cubs, sets the game on fire with phenomenal batting until a horrific incident happens. Grisham takes great care in his descriptive work, and has obviously visited Calico Rock. I am from Arkansas, or at least have been since I was twelve, for forty years, so I know whether or not he''s done his homework. The town sits on a huge bluff overlooking the White River, which at that point is near navigable stage, wide and deep. The BNSF has trains running along the river bank, and the setting is truly idyllic.
It''s difficult to not want to share plot points, but suffice it to say that the book is believable through and through. It''s touching, brutal in parts, and manages to get the reader excited even if temporarily in the wonder years of baseball, in the era of greats like Tom Seaver, Willie Stargell, Johnny Bench, Harmon Killebrew and others.
But it''s the fictional part of the book where the main characters are placed in the world of the real players that carries the day. Grisham shows a tender side to his writing, and for my money "Calico Joe" could be made into a good movie. It''s one of the better books I''ve read this summer.
4 people found this helpful
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Top reviews from other countries

Just for Today
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
I now feel more grounded in the sport of Baseball
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on April 11, 2017
A complete departure from the author''s usual subject matter. Not being very knowledgeable about Baseball I now feel more grounded in the sport and am looking forward to attending a game when I next visit my sister in Toronto. The story line touched me as I could identify...See more
A complete departure from the author''s usual subject matter. Not being very knowledgeable about Baseball I now feel more grounded in the sport and am looking forward to attending a game when I next visit my sister in Toronto. The story line touched me as I could identify somewhat with one of the main characters. I looked forward to reading the book each evening and am grateful for the author''s continued output.
6 people found this helpful
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Freddie
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
One for baseball fans only.
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on June 6, 2018
Though the story is well written, as you would expect from John Grisham, the reader will be caught out if they do not understand the language of baseball. I found myself skipping large parts of the text in an effort to keep up with the human aspect of the story. Sorry, this...See more
Though the story is well written, as you would expect from John Grisham, the reader will be caught out if they do not understand the language of baseball. I found myself skipping large parts of the text in an effort to keep up with the human aspect of the story. Sorry, this one is not a tale I would bother to read again. Only for diehard baseball fans.
One person found this helpful
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rj p.
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Hooked from the start to finish!
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on August 21, 2017
John Grisham takes a complete novice into the exciting world of Baseball and invites you to explore it''s interesting characters in a gripping and moving read. It''s an incredible story that exposes the ugliness of our human hearts, the sometimes monumental consequences of...See more
John Grisham takes a complete novice into the exciting world of Baseball and invites you to explore it''s interesting characters in a gripping and moving read. It''s an incredible story that exposes the ugliness of our human hearts, the sometimes monumental consequences of our actions and the peace that comes through forgiveness and restoration. It reveals the power and wonder of true forgiveness between fellow human beings but also highlights the tragedy of unnecessary wasted years of broken relationships. It will educate, thrill, grip and move you as you quickly turn from one page to the next. As the story came to a close I couldn''t help but think about the greater forgiveness and restoration we all need in this life and beyond. Outstanding!
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Doughnut
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
For die-hard baseball fans only
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on January 16, 2019
I suppose the detailed rules of baseball in the prologue should have warned me about the content. I had to skip a lot of pages due to the excessive baseball information. The story itself was a bit thin and could easily be passed as a short story rather than a book, for...See more
I suppose the detailed rules of baseball in the prologue should have warned me about the content. I had to skip a lot of pages due to the excessive baseball information. The story itself was a bit thin and could easily be passed as a short story rather than a book, for die-hard fans only.
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G. F. Kershaw
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
I have read many JG stories and this one was the most boring, apart from the last 3 chapters
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on June 4, 2018
Not over impressed with this novel, I have read many JG stories and this one was the most boring, apart from the last 3 chapters. Gordon K,Spain
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Calico discount Joe: outlet sale A Novel outlet sale

Calico discount Joe: outlet sale A Novel outlet sale

Calico discount Joe: outlet sale A Novel outlet sale

Calico discount Joe: outlet sale A Novel outlet sale

Calico discount Joe: outlet sale A Novel outlet sale

Calico discount Joe: outlet sale A Novel outlet sale

Calico discount Joe: outlet sale A Novel outlet sale

Calico discount Joe: outlet sale A Novel outlet sale

Calico discount Joe: outlet sale A Novel outlet sale

Calico discount Joe: outlet sale A Novel outlet sale

Calico discount Joe: outlet sale A Novel outlet sale

Calico discount Joe: outlet sale A Novel outlet sale

Calico discount Joe: outlet sale A Novel outlet sale

Calico discount Joe: outlet sale A Novel outlet sale

Calico discount Joe: outlet sale A Novel outlet sale

Calico discount Joe: outlet sale A Novel outlet sale

Calico discount Joe: outlet sale A Novel outlet sale

Calico discount Joe: outlet sale A Novel outlet sale

Calico discount Joe: outlet sale A Novel outlet sale

Calico discount Joe: outlet sale A Novel outlet sale

Calico discount Joe: outlet sale A Novel outlet sale

Calico discount Joe: outlet sale A Novel outlet sale

Calico discount Joe: outlet sale A Novel outlet sale

Calico discount Joe: outlet sale A Novel outlet sale